Workshop Co-organized
by IABS, Paul-Ehrlich-Institut
and Hungarian National Food Chain Safety Office


Scientific Committee

Carmen Jungbäck
PEI, Germany
Gabor Kulcsar
NEBIH, Hungary
Attila Farsang
NEBIH, Hungary
Rick E. Hill
IABS, USA
David Mackay
EMA, EU
Cyril Gay
ARS-USDA, USA
Vaughn Kubiak
Zoetis, Belgium
Egbert Mundt
Boehringer-Ingelheim,
Germany
Philippe Vannier
IABS, France
Jürgen Richt
Kansas University, USA
Jim Roth
Iowa University, USA

 

Meeting management:

IABS
Geneva, Switzerland





Objectives of the Workshop

Emerging infectious diseases (EID) challenge the health of domestic and wild animals and humans. EID may spread easily, irrespective of political and geographic borders. Uncontrolled  spread is fostered by the increased global movement of domestic animals and food produced from animals, as well as by vectors such as humans, wild animals, intermediate hosts, and contaminated materials of all kind.  Other factors, such as climate change, might also play a role.

Outbreaks of diseases in livestock have a significant  impact on national economies, individual’s livelihood and quality of life, as well as on the global safety and security of food products.

Although there is significant progress being made in developing new vaccines against a wide range of animal diseases, emerging infections and transboundary spread still pose specific challenges in terms of surveillance, control and eradication.

The purpose of the meeting to be held in the beautiful city of Budapest, on September 28-30, 2016 is to provide an update on the identification, tracking and control of emerging infectious diseases of animals.  State-of-the-art lectures will discuss licensing procedures for  novel vaccines for emergency use, novel surveillance, diagnostic and control strategies, as well the environmental factors affecting disease outbreak and spread.   The meeting is designed to bring together subject matter experts from academia, industry as well as national and international regularity agencies.

The meeting is sponsored jointly by the National Food Chain Safety Office Directorate of Veterinary Medicinal products, Budapest, Hungary; and IABS (International Alliance for Biological Standardization), Geneva, Switzerland and the Paul-Ehrlich Institut, Langen, Germany.